Posts in Panoramic Glass Elevator
Canadian Museum for Human Rights Takes Guests on a Skyward Journey

Built on Treaty One territory, in the Forks historic site in Winnipeg, Manitoba, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights stands as a monument to Canada’s pursuit of equal human rights for all. Completed in 2014, and designed by Architect Antoine Predock, its spiralling design takes visitors on an upward journey, progressing from ground to sky, dark to light, to a viewing platform and panoramic view of the sky, city and the natural realm beyond.

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25 Creative Elevator Designs That Changed Everything

Elevator design is not something many people think of. Even professional architects, urban planners and designers overlook their significance to modern buildings and cities as a whole. Over the past decade our team of vertical transportation specialists has worked to elevate the narrative around these little spaces in a big way.

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London to Introduce the ‘Chimney Lift’

Last month, London’s Battersea Power Station unveiled a major new attraction, a panoramic glass elevator which will travel to the top of one of Englands most iconic chimneys. Most famously know for its use on the cover image for Pink Floyds album ‘Animals’ has been apart of a redevelopment project for almost a decade.

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Featured Elevator Atrium on Bay | Yonge & Dundas - Toronto

Originally opened in 1979, the Atrium on Bay features OTIS panoramic traction elevators overlooking a 14 storey atrium. The building takes up most of the block bounded by Yonge, Dundas, Bay, and Edward Streets in Toronto's Commercial heart, just north of the Eaton Centre. 

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Featured Elevator Toronto Eatons Centre | 220 Yonge St - Toronto

Designed by Eberhard Zeidler and Bregman + Hamann Architects as a multi-levelled, vaulted glass-ceiling galleria, modelled after the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II in Milan, Italy, the Toronto Eatons Centre is a one of a kind mall in downtown Toronto.

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Toronto's CNE Shell Tower

Located on Princess Boulevard, The Shell Tower was built by the Shell Oil Company in 1955 for the Canadian National Exhibition. It was a glass and steel structure, almost 12 storeys in height (120’), containing a central elevator shaft, two glass staircases, and an observation deck near the top overlooking the entire CNE grounds.

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